Tagged: Open Science

In memoriam of Jon Tennant (1988-2020)

We will remember April 2020 as days of uncertainty and tragic losses worldwide. In this extraordinary time, we do not only mourn victims of the pandemic. Just as incomprehensibly, on the 9th of April we lost Jon Tennant, a bright and tireless pioneer of Open Science and democracy in access to knowledge. In this post, I wish to connect you with and highlight pieces from his legacy.


A sneak peek into the SSH component of EOSC: interview with the SSHOC Marketplace team

From the beginning of 2019, DARIAH is contributing to the development of the SSH component of the European Open Science Cloud. This bold endeavour is coming to existence through the Social Sciences and Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC) project where Europea n infrastructures: DARIAH, CLARIN, SHARE, ESS, and CESSDA (who is leading the project) teamed up to build a transformational resource for the arts, humanities and social sciences, aligned with the EOSC but also with the requirements of these research communities. Not much after the project celebrated its first year, I spoke with the DARIAH-SSHOC team, Frank Fischer, Matej Ďurčo, Laure Barbot and Clara Petitfils about how the SSH Open Marketplace is taking shape.

Open Science and DH tools that come handy at the time of corona (and beyond)

As a response to the challenges ahead, from last week, suddenly online became the default means of teaching for the great majority of European schools and higher education institutions. In response to the immediate challenges coming with the rapid switch to online-only teaching systems, a variety of crowdsourced collections started to float around on Twitter, blogs and other online platforms (you can find a selection them at the bottom of this post) – and I could not help but think about some Open Science and DH tools that I think could be valuable additions to any distant learning setting, regardless on which institutional apparatus we have at our disposal.

Viennese coffee culture at the Vienna Open Science Café

During Open Access Week 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ACDH) hosted a full-day workshop on the topic of “Open Science Methods and Tools for DH Scholars”. This event provided participants with an overview of the Open Science landscape in Austria and Europe, possibilities for Open Science training and funding, Open Science tools as well as the legal framework to consider when opening up research. All presentations and slides shown at this event are of course openly available (here). In the afternoon, the ACDH team organized the Viennese manifestation of an Open Science Café, offering an opportunity for attendees to bring their questions and reflect on the open research culture as it makes sense in their respective scholarly contexts. In addition to exciting conversation and controversial discussions, this also included lots of cake, cookies, and coffee. In the following sections, moderators, facilitators, and information sources for participants of the Café, Monika Bargmann, Susanne Blumesberger, Andreas Ferus, and Martina Trognitz share their insights and experiences about the Viennese Open Café session.

The ACDH virtual hackathon series: Open Data for Open Source solutions

At the beginning of 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ACDH) started an experiment: For the first time ever, we published the calls for participation in three virtual hackathons. The hackathons would focus on Open Data sets publicly available online, and the tasks to perform on these data would involve creating Open Source code. Each of the hackathons had a special theme and was co-timed with events that involve an aspect of Openness. These events also inspired the choice of the respective data sets. The best contributions would be determined by an international board of judges and receive cash prizes. The criteria for judgement were the following: Creativity, innovation (e.g. Is the approach/idea new and unique? Does it do something that hasn’t been done before? Does it provide new insights into the data? Does the hack provide a new/faster/clearer solution to the old...

Welcome to DARIAH Open

Open Science is a great enterprise that comes in a variety of flavours. For many, it empowers individuals to become champions of social, cultural and technological innovation, a solution for the global serial crisis and a way for researcher communities to take back control over the dynamics of knowledge creation and dissemination. Also, from another viewpoint, it is a means for intellectuals to become better citizens by opening up their findings to the public and earning wider recognition in their research field. But it can also be thought of a skillset to make the best use of digital technology in the networked 21st century for more efficient, transparent, and reusable scholarship.  Or simply a means to get more funding. Or, for that matter, a scientific paradigm shift that is not always easy to keep up with and translate to one’s own research practices. It can be perceived as a natural...