DARIAH Open Open scholarly practices in the arts and humanities

3 ways in which DARIAH contributes to the EOSC

In the third episode of our EOSC blog series, we touch upon the many ways in which DARIAH contributes to the EOSC. We discuss, what does it mean to contribute to the EOSC federation as a distributed infrastructure and what are the challenges and opportunities we see for DARIAH members.

Open Scholar Stars Series: Interview with Patrik Svensson

In the next episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with Patrik Svensson, Professor in the Humanities and Information Technology, Umeå University, former Director of HUMlab (2000-2014), and, not least, Chair of the DARIAH Scientific Board. We chat about Digital Humanities and DARIAH, his experiences with Open Access publishing and his new role at the Open Research Europe platform, translating epistemic cultures to infrastructure needs, our COVID afterlife, and many more!

What’s in the EOSC for DARIAH partner institutions?

In this series of blog posts, we outline concrete ways in which scholarly and service provider communities around DARIAH can interact with the EOSC and the value it holds for them. We also summarize the many ways in which DARIAH already contributes to the EOSC. In this second post, we are focusing on what it means for DARIAH national nodes and partner institutions to join/contribute to the EOSC. We share insights on how you can register DARIAH-affiliated services to the EOSC and what are the added values.

What is in the EOSC for Arts and Humanities researchers?

EOSC (the European Open Science Cloud) is a big acronym, representing the bold vision of enabling all European researchers to deposit, access and analyze scholarly resources beyond borders and disciplines. Over the past years, it has become a central component of European science policy and, since its launch in October 2018, a reality as an infrastructure too. Still, due to the scale, the complexity and the multiple dimensions of the endeavor, it is not easy to gain an accurate overview and translate the offerings of the EOSC into one’s own institution or research setting. In this series of blog posts, we outline concrete ways in which scholarly and service provider communities around DARIAH can interact with the EOSC and the value it holds for them. We also summarize the many ways in which DARIAH already contributes to the EOSC. To kick start the series, in the first post we have a look at what the EOSC holds for researchers and, in particular, Arts and Humanities researchers.

SSHOC-DARIAH Train-the-Trainer Research Data Management Bootcamp

In this blog, you can read a brief recap of the SSHOC-DARIAH Train-the-Trainer Research Data Management Bootcamp (8. and 11.02.2021). Click to access the materials and also to read about how the event supported new data support professionals in the Social Sciences and Humanities to gain practical, hands-on experiences and exchange around key RDM topics of cost management, GDPR and ethical issues of working with social media data and dealing with third-party data coming from Cultural Heritage institutions.

Exhibitions Inside Exhibitions with The Digital Repository of Ireland

The COVID-19 pandemic has clearly emphasized the importance of remote access and digital technologies to innovate interactions between Cultural Heritage Institutions and Humanities researchers. In our next guest post, Louise Nash, Master of Philosophy student in Digital Humanities and Culture at the Trinity College Dublin, currently spending her internship at DARIAH, is sharing her takes on the “Using Digital Archives for Historical Research” webinar organized by the The Digital Repository of Ireland. Enjoy!

Connecting Arts and Humanities to the European open data commons: the OpenAIRE-DARIAH Research Community Gateway

The role of discovery platforms is becoming crucial as we produce an increasing amount of scholarly publications year by year. Not only they serve as a filtering interface (generous or not :-)) to mediate between ourselves, machines and the body of knowledge that is impossible to manually navigate (and stay on top of), but they also have a strong influence on knowledge representation in general. In this post, we take a look at how DARIAH helps connect Arts and Humanities research data and other content types to the OpenAIRE Research Graph to increase their visibility and reusability beyond geographical, language and disciplinary borders.

Open Science in the Horizon Europe funding programme: what to expect?

Without the slightest doubt, I think, we are all ready to let 2020 go and look forward to something different to come. In this forward-looking spirit, sharing information about the coming EU funding framework seems to be an appropriate topic for the last DARIAH Open post in 2020. As such, we are going to have a look at how Open Science is taking shape in the nascent Horizon Europe funding programme for 2021-2027, what to expect and what are the major changes compared to the previous funding programme, Horizon 2020.

Microsoft, we have to talk…

Well-functioning infrastructures tend to become invisible. Working remotely (even more so) adds a very sensitive twist to this premise, as it makes apparent how much we are dependent on, and even exposed to crucial everyday IT infrastructures. Our collective struggles with the limitations, misalignments or even ecosystem wars encoded in their use do not only affect our work-life and productivity (and mental sanity?) but also highlight serious ethical, conceptual issues underlying them.
Jennifer Edmond’s satirical take on this state of affairs below gives us a massively relatable insight of how vendor lock-in feels in a work setting that is already locked enough. What are our options to realign information management systems with our own workflows and not the other way around? How to take into account that many of us have wide collaborative networks, and thus we can’t just stay by one platform or one brand chosen by our institutions? Where are our collective investments in developing competitive but public alternatives, or do we really need to sacrifice community control and transparency on the altar of reliability and stable performance?
Read, relate, think, enjoy.

DARIAH’s highlights for the Open Access Week 2020

Beyond any doubt, 2020 marked an extraordinary year in the development of Open Access. To celebrate Open Access Week of this special year, we brought together a brief selection of events, resources and tools that help scholarly communities to gain back control over scholarly communication infrastructure. In addition to DARIAH’s highlights, we also recommend programs from the rich Open Access Week calendar of the Open Access Book Network.

Launch of the ELDAH GDPR Wizard – Interview with Walter Scholger

Today, I am talking with Walter Scholger, Institute manager of the Centre for Information Modelling – Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ZIM-ACDH), co-chair of DARIAH’s ELDAH Working Group, on the occasion of the launch of the DARIAH ELDAH Consent Form Wizard. We will chat about how ELDAH’s work helps us to navigate through the ethical and legal complexities of arts and humanities scholarship. Or, in other words, how we can do and share our research the right way.

DARIAH’s input to the Open Consultation for the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC)

On the 20th of July, the EOSC Executive Board launched a large-scale open consultation on the EOSC Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA). The aim of this consultation was to shape the strategic objectives, action areas, implementation priorities and partnerships for the 2024-2028 phase of the EOSC development. In this post, we put forward the key points of DARIAH’s response to the consultation.

Open Scholar Stars interview series: Interview with Kathleen Gregory

In the next episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with Kathleen Gregory, Researcher and PhD Candidate at Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS). Why is scholarly data discovery a social practice? What are the skills that are important in effective data discovery and evaluation for reuse? How the data landscape could and should change in the near future and what are the special flavors of data search in the arts and humanities disciplines? Click to read what Kathleen’s research reveals us about all these exciting issues.

In memoriam of Jon Tennant (1988-2020)

We will remember April 2020 as days of uncertainty and tragic losses worldwide. In this extraordinary time, we do not only mourn victims of the pandemic. Just as incomprehensibly, on the 9th of April we lost Jon Tennant, a bright and tireless pioneer of Open Science and democracy in access to knowledge. In this post, I wish to connect you with and highlight pieces from his legacy.


Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search