Tagged: Open humanities

DARIAH’s highlights for the Open Access Week 2020

Beyond any doubt, 2020 marked an extraordinary year in the development of Open Access. To celebrate Open Access Week of this special year, we brought together a brief selection of events, resources and tools that help scholarly communities to gain back control over scholarly communication infrastructure. In addition to DARIAH’s highlights, we also recommend programs from the rich Open Access Week calendar of the Open Access Book Network.

DARIAH’s input to the Open Consultation for the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC)

On the 20th of July, the EOSC Executive Board launched a large-scale open consultation on the EOSC Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA). The aim of this consultation was to shape the strategic objectives, action areas, implementation priorities and partnerships for the 2024-2028 phase of the EOSC development. In this post, we put forward the key points of DARIAH’s response to the consultation.

Viennese coffee culture at the Vienna Open Science Café

During Open Access Week 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ACDH) hosted a full-day workshop on the topic of “Open Science Methods and Tools for DH Scholars”. This event provided participants with an overview of the Open Science landscape in Austria and Europe, possibilities for Open Science training and funding, Open Science tools as well as the legal framework to consider when opening up research. All presentations and slides shown at this event are of course openly available (here). In the afternoon, the ACDH team organized the Viennese manifestation of an Open Science Café, offering an opportunity for attendees to bring their questions and reflect on the open research culture as it makes sense in their respective scholarly contexts. In addition to exciting conversation and controversial discussions, this also included lots of cake, cookies, and coffee. In the following sections, moderators, facilitators, and information sources for participants of the Café, Monika Bargmann, Susanne Blumesberger, Andreas Ferus, and Martina Trognitz share their insights and experiences about the Viennese Open Café session.

Open Access Week special edition #1: interview with Dr. Samuel Moore, co-organiser of the Radical Open Access collective

This year, we are celebrating Open Access Week by introducing fair and scholar-led Open Access publishing initiatives to the DARIAH communities. In the first episode, Dr. Samuel Moore, co-organizer of the Radical Open Access collective shares his views on which flavors of Open Access works best for arts and humanities research.

The ACDH virtual hackathon series: Open Data for Open Source solutions

At the beginning of 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ACDH) started an experiment: For the first time ever, we published the calls for participation in three virtual hackathons. The hackathons would focus on Open Data sets publicly available online, and the tasks to perform on these data would involve creating Open Source code. Each of the hackathons had a special theme and was co-timed with events that involve an aspect of Openness. These events also inspired the choice of the respective data sets. The best contributions would be determined by an international board of judges and receive cash prizes. The criteria for judgement were the following: Creativity, innovation (e.g. Is the approach/idea new and unique? Does it do something that hasn’t been done before? Does it provide new insights into the data? Does the hack provide a new/faster/clearer solution to the old...

Open data for humanists: big differences in small steps

In the arts and humanities, digital data production is still expensive, challenging and time-consuming. We all know this, and yet the results of these processes often in the end can’t be reused by other researchers, meaning that we reinvent (or redigitise) the wheel far too often. This resource is aimed at giving practical advice for arts and humanities scholars who are willing to take their first steps in research data management but don’t know where to begin. Our approach to data management views it as a reflective process that exposes and tweaks existing behaviours, rather than one that introduces specific tools. It is intended to encourage awareness of one’s own processes and mindfulness about how they could be more open and how and how small changes across three points in your research workflow can make big differences.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search