Tagged: Open humanities

Talking peer review series #2: Experiences in Optimizing Peer-Reviewing – A success story in five acts, three years, and two astonishing voting rounds

Peer review is a central scholarly practice, a practice that carries an enormous weight in terms of gatekeeping; shaping disciplines, publication patterns and power relations. It governs the (re)distribution of resources such as research grants, promotions, tenure and even larger institutional budgets. As such, it is crucial to deeply understand how it works in situated evaluation practices, and to continually rethink it to strive for its best, and least imperfect (or reasonably imperfect) instances. This new series on the blog, Talking Peer Review, is a means to do just that. You will find here reflections, reports, opinion pieces and, to bring in some metascience, reviews of the current state of the art in the arts and humanities disciplines. In this episode Anne Baillot, Professor in German Studies at Le Mans Université shares her and her team’s experiences on bringing open peer review to the annual conference of the German-speaking Digital Humanities association – in 5 acts. Her insights do not only shed light on some of the dramatic aspects of peer review and showcase why it is difficult to change ingrained, established practices; but also reveal how an empathetic, deeply sensible approach can foster meaningful dialogues across members of a scholarly association and can eventually lead to the redefinition of such practices along increased transparency and equity.

The Trouble With Big Data: insights from Jennifer Edmond, Jörg Lehmann, Mike Priddy and Nicola Horsley 

In this episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with a whole group: Jennifer Edmond (Trinity College Dublin), Jörg Lehmann (University of Tübingen), Mike Priddy (Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS), and Nicola Horsley (Leeds Beckett University) on occasion of the publication of their Open Access book, The Trouble With Big Data: How Datafication Displaces Cultural Practices. We discuss inherent disciplinary and cultural biases in doing data-driven research,  digitization agendas,  data and power, data metaphors, apen access book publishing and more. Enjoy! 

Talking peer review series #1: On kindness in scholarly evaluation practices – a guest post

Peer review is a central scholarly practice, a practice that carries an enormous weight in terms of gatekeeping; shaping disciplines, publication patterns and power relations. It governs the (re)distribution of resources such as research grants, promotions, tenure and even larger institutional budgets. As such, it is crucial to deeply understand how it works in situated evaluation practices, and to continually rethink it to strive for its best, and least imperfect (or reasonably imperfect) instances. This new series on the blog, Talking Peer Review, is a means to do just that. You will find here reflections, reports, opinion pieces and, to bring in some metascience, reviews of the current state of the art in the arts and humanities disciplines. In the first episode, Anne Baillot, Professor in German Studies at Le Mans Université shares insights about the value of kindness in peer review and possibilities to bring more transparency to the process Enjoy! 

3 ways in which DARIAH contributes to the EOSC

In the third episode of our EOSC blog series, we touch upon the many ways in which DARIAH contributes to the EOSC. We discuss, what does it mean to contribute to the EOSC federation as a distributed infrastructure and what are the challenges and opportunities we see for DARIAH members.

Open Scholar Stars Series: Interview with Patrik Svensson

In the next episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with Patrik Svensson, Professor in the Humanities and Information Technology, Umeå University, former Director of HUMlab (2000-2014), and, not least, Chair of the DARIAH Scientific Board. We chat about Digital Humanities and DARIAH, his experiences with Open Access publishing and his new role at the Open Research Europe platform, translating epistemic cultures to infrastructure needs, our COVID afterlife, and many more!

What is in the EOSC for Arts and Humanities researchers?

EOSC (the European Open Science Cloud) is a big acronym, representing the bold vision of enabling all European researchers to deposit, access and analyze scholarly resources beyond borders and disciplines. Over the past years, it has become a central component of European science policy and, since its launch in October 2018, a reality as an infrastructure too. Still, due to the scale, the complexity and the multiple dimensions of the endeavor, it is not easy to gain an accurate overview and translate the offerings of the EOSC into one’s own institution or research setting. In this series of blog posts, we outline concrete ways in which scholarly and service provider communities around DARIAH can interact with the EOSC and the value it holds for them. We also summarize the many ways in which DARIAH already contributes to the EOSC. To kick start the series, in the first post we have a look at what the EOSC holds for researchers and, in particular, Arts and Humanities researchers.

Connecting Arts and Humanities to the European open data commons: the OpenAIRE-DARIAH Research Community Gateway

The role of discovery platforms is becoming crucial as we produce an increasing amount of scholarly publications year by year. Not only they serve as a filtering interface (generous or not :-)) to mediate between ourselves, machines and the body of knowledge that is impossible to manually navigate (and stay on top of), but they also have a strong influence on knowledge representation in general. In this post, we take a look at how DARIAH helps connect Arts and Humanities research data and other content types to the OpenAIRE Research Graph to increase their visibility and reusability beyond geographical, language and disciplinary borders.

DARIAH’s highlights for the Open Access Week 2020

Beyond any doubt, 2020 marked an extraordinary year in the development of Open Access. To celebrate Open Access Week of this special year, we brought together a brief selection of events, resources and tools that help scholarly communities to gain back control over scholarly communication infrastructure. In addition to DARIAH’s highlights, we also recommend programs from the rich Open Access Week calendar of the Open Access Book Network.

DARIAH’s input to the Open Consultation for the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC)

On the 20th of July, the EOSC Executive Board launched a large-scale open consultation on the EOSC Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA). The aim of this consultation was to shape the strategic objectives, action areas, implementation priorities and partnerships for the 2024-2028 phase of the EOSC development. In this post, we put forward the key points of DARIAH’s response to the consultation.

Viennese coffee culture at the Vienna Open Science Café

During Open Access Week 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ACDH) hosted a full-day workshop on the topic of “Open Science Methods and Tools for DH Scholars”. This event provided participants with an overview of the Open Science landscape in Austria and Europe, possibilities for Open Science training and funding, Open Science tools as well as the legal framework to consider when opening up research. All presentations and slides shown at this event are of course openly available (here). In the afternoon, the ACDH team organized the Viennese manifestation of an Open Science Café, offering an opportunity for attendees to bring their questions and reflect on the open research culture as it makes sense in their respective scholarly contexts. In addition to exciting conversation and controversial discussions, this also included lots of cake, cookies, and coffee. In the following sections, moderators, facilitators, and information sources for participants of the Café, Monika Bargmann, Susanne Blumesberger, Andreas Ferus, and Martina Trognitz share their insights and experiences about the Viennese Open Café session.

Open Access Week special edition #1: interview with Dr. Samuel Moore, co-organiser of the Radical Open Access collective

This year, we are celebrating Open Access Week by introducing fair and scholar-led Open Access publishing initiatives to the DARIAH communities. In the first episode, Dr. Samuel Moore, co-organizer of the Radical Open Access collective shares his views on which flavors of Open Access works best for arts and humanities research.

The ACDH virtual hackathon series: Open Data for Open Source solutions

At the beginning of 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ACDH) started an experiment: For the first time ever, we published the calls for participation in three virtual hackathons. The hackathons would focus on Open Data sets publicly available online, and the tasks to perform on these data would involve creating Open Source code. Each of the hackathons had a special theme and was co-timed with events that involve an aspect of Openness. These events also inspired the choice of the respective data sets. The best contributions would be determined by an international board of judges and receive cash prizes. The criteria for judgement were the following: Creativity, innovation (e.g. Is the approach/idea new and unique? Does it do something that hasn’t been done before? Does it provide new insights into the data? Does the hack provide a new/faster/clearer solution to the old...