Tagged: Open data

The “Holy Grail” of Digital Humanists – Some Thoughts About “Understanding Data” (for Humanists)

As a reader of blog posts, you might be well aware how important role commentaries happening on blogs can play in the establishment of a specific scholarly discourses. In this piece, you can read our guest author’s, Stefan Karcher’s reflection on Jim Casey’s recent blog post, Taste the Data where he introduces a new didactic approach to discover important information and structures in a data set. So, how do your data taste?

Open Science and DH tools that come handy at the time of corona (and beyond)

As a response to the challenges ahead, from last week, suddenly online became the default means of teaching for the great majority of European schools and higher education institutions. In response to the immediate challenges coming with the rapid switch to online-only teaching systems, a variety of crowdsourced collections started to float around on Twitter, blogs and other online platforms (you can find a selection them at the bottom of this post) – and I could not help but think about some Open Science and DH tools that I think could be valuable additions to any distant learning setting, regardless on which institutional apparatus we have at our disposal.

The ACDH virtual hackathon series: Open Data for Open Source solutions

At the beginning of 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ACDH) started an experiment: For the first time ever, we published the calls for participation in three virtual hackathons. The hackathons would focus on Open Data sets publicly available online, and the tasks to perform on these data would involve creating Open Source code. Each of the hackathons had a special theme and was co-timed with events that involve an aspect of Openness. These events also inspired the choice of the respective data sets. The best contributions would be determined by an international board of judges and receive cash prizes. The criteria for judgement were the following: Creativity, innovation (e.g. Is the approach/idea new and unique? Does it do something that hasn’t been done before? Does it provide new insights into the data? Does the hack provide a new/faster/clearer solution to the old...

Open data for humanists: big differences in small steps

In the arts and humanities, digital data production is still expensive, challenging and time-consuming. We all know this, and yet the results of these processes often in the end can’t be reused by other researchers, meaning that we reinvent (or redigitise) the wheel far too often. This resource is aimed at giving practical advice for arts and humanities scholars who are willing to take their first steps in research data management but don’t know where to begin. Our approach to data management views it as a reflective process that exposes and tweaks existing behaviours, rather than one that introduces specific tools. It is intended to encourage awareness of one’s own processes and mindfulness about how they could be more open and how and how small changes across three points in your research workflow can make big differences.

Open Access Toolkit: DARIAH’s practical recommendations to promote Open Access within the arts and humanities

In this post we bring together recommendations, tools, platforms and other resources that you may find helpful when disseminating you research. All of them are available for everyone, regardless of geographical or disciplinary background, and can be directly and easily included in the publishing workflows of our communities.

Open Access guidelines for the arts and humanities: recommendations by DARIAH

In the recent months, European policymakers and funding bodies made a bold move to set full and and immediate Open Access to scholarly publications the default. Open Access became a critical global issue and thus researchers need to be well-informed about its benefits, pitfalls, but most importantly, about their options to openly disseminate their own research results. In our Open Access guidelines, we propose recommendations to improve Open Access to publications in the arts and humanities. Our core aim is to bring closer the harmonized but transforming European Open Access policy landscape to the communities around DARIAH and recommend very practical steps to achieve compliance with it.