Tagged: Digital Humanities

Talking peer review series #2: Experiences in Optimizing Peer-Reviewing – A success story in five acts, three years, and two astonishing voting rounds

Peer review is a central scholarly practice, a practice that carries an enormous weight in terms of gatekeeping; shaping disciplines, publication patterns and power relations. It governs the (re)distribution of resources such as research grants, promotions, tenure and even larger institutional budgets. As such, it is crucial to deeply understand how it works in situated evaluation practices, and to continually rethink it to strive for its best, and least imperfect (or reasonably imperfect) instances. This new series on the blog, Talking Peer Review, is a means to do just that. You will find here reflections, reports, opinion pieces and, to bring in some metascience, reviews of the current state of the art in the arts and humanities disciplines. In this episode Anne Baillot, Professor in German Studies at Le Mans Université shares her and her team’s experiences on bringing open peer review to the annual conference of the German-speaking Digital Humanities association – in 5 acts. Her insights do not only shed light on some of the dramatic aspects of peer review and showcase why it is difficult to change ingrained, established practices; but also reveal how an empathetic, deeply sensible approach can foster meaningful dialogues across members of a scholarly association and can eventually lead to the redefinition of such practices along increased transparency and equity.

The Trouble With Big Data: insights from Jennifer Edmond, Jörg Lehmann, Mike Priddy and Nicola Horsley 

In this episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with a whole group: Jennifer Edmond (Trinity College Dublin), Jörg Lehmann (University of Tübingen), Mike Priddy (Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS), and Nicola Horsley (Leeds Beckett University) on occasion of the publication of their Open Access book, The Trouble With Big Data: How Datafication Displaces Cultural Practices. We discuss inherent disciplinary and cultural biases in doing data-driven research,  digitization agendas,  data and power, data metaphors, apen access book publishing and more. Enjoy! 

Open Scholar Stars Series: Interview with Patrik Svensson

In the next episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with Patrik Svensson, Professor in the Humanities and Information Technology, Umeå University, former Director of HUMlab (2000-2014), and, not least, Chair of the DARIAH Scientific Board. We chat about Digital Humanities and DARIAH, his experiences with Open Access publishing and his new role at the Open Research Europe platform, translating epistemic cultures to infrastructure needs, our COVID afterlife, and many more!

A sneak peek into the SSH component of EOSC: interview with the SSHOC Marketplace team

From the beginning of 2019, DARIAH is contributing to the development of the SSH component of the European Open Science Cloud. This bold endeavour is coming to existence through the Social Sciences and Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC) project where Europea n infrastructures: DARIAH, CLARIN, SHARE, ESS, and CESSDA (who is leading the project) teamed up to build a transformational resource for the arts, humanities and social sciences, aligned with the EOSC but also with the requirements of these research communities. Not much after the project celebrated its first year, I spoke with the DARIAH-SSHOC team, Frank Fischer, Matej Ďurčo, Laure Barbot and Clara Petitfils about how the SSH Open Marketplace is taking shape.

Open Science and DH tools that come handy at the time of corona (and beyond)

As a response to the challenges ahead, from last week, suddenly online became the default means of teaching for the great majority of European schools and higher education institutions. In response to the immediate challenges coming with the rapid switch to online-only teaching systems, a variety of crowdsourced collections started to float around on Twitter, blogs and other online platforms (you can find a selection them at the bottom of this post) – and I could not help but think about some Open Science and DH tools that I think could be valuable additions to any distant learning setting, regardless on which institutional apparatus we have at our disposal.

Laying the Pavement Where People Actually Walk: Thoughts on Our Chances of Bringing Scholarship Back to the Heart of Scholarly Communication

Recently, the ScholarLed team invited me to contribute to their blog post collection celebrating Open Access Week 2019. It was my pleasure to share some of my thoughts on the conflict between the richness of contemporary scholarship in the arts and the prestige economy that defines our current academic evaluation culture. You can also read the post here on DARIAHOpen or on ScholarLed’s blog together with the other pieces of the collection. In our last Open Access week post on Friday, we take the chance to bring you closer to the initiative.