Tagged: Cultural heritage

The Trouble With Big Data: insights from Jennifer Edmond, Jörg Lehmann, Mike Priddy and Nicola Horsley 

In this episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with a whole group: Jennifer Edmond (Trinity College Dublin), Jörg Lehmann (University of Tübingen), Mike Priddy (Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS), and Nicola Horsley (Leeds Beckett University) on occasion of the publication of their Open Access book, The Trouble With Big Data: How Datafication Displaces Cultural Practices. We discuss inherent disciplinary and cultural biases in doing data-driven research,  digitization agendas,  data and power, data metaphors, apen access book publishing and more. Enjoy! 

Developing Identifiers for Heritage Collections: Q&A with Rebecca Grant (F1000) and Frances Madden (British Library), authors of the Open Educational Resource

Persistent Identifiers (DOIs, handles, ORCID IDs, Wikidata IDs etc.) became essential resources in our increasingly noisy digital workplaces. Beyond enabling linking instead of losing our resources, PIDs usually come with secure storing, versioning and long-term archiving solutions too. Although assigning PIDs to our scholarly outputs became a no-brainer on the level of project and data management guidelines, in reality, the selection and implementation of PID systems are anything but straightforward – especially in working conditions where the use of Zenodo or other research data repositories is simply not the best solution. In this post, we are talking with Frances Madden (British Library) and Rebecca Grant (F1000) on occasion of releasing a new Open Educational Resource which provides guidance on developing and using PIDs in the context of heritage collections. 

Exhibitions Inside Exhibitions with The Digital Repository of Ireland

The COVID-19 pandemic has clearly emphasized the importance of remote access and digital technologies to innovate interactions between Cultural Heritage Institutions and Humanities researchers. In our next guest post, Louise Nash, Master of Philosophy student in Digital Humanities and Culture at the Trinity College Dublin, currently spending her internship at DARIAH, is sharing her takes on the “Using Digital Archives for Historical Research” webinar organized by the The Digital Repository of Ireland. Enjoy!

DARIAH’s highlights for the Open Access Week 2020

Beyond any doubt, 2020 marked an extraordinary year in the development of Open Access. To celebrate Open Access Week of this special year, we brought together a brief selection of events, resources and tools that help scholarly communities to gain back control over scholarly communication infrastructure. In addition to DARIAH’s highlights, we also recommend programs from the rich Open Access Week calendar of the Open Access Book Network.

Open data for humanists: big differences in small steps

In the arts and humanities, digital data production is still expensive, challenging and time-consuming. We all know this, and yet the results of these processes often in the end can’t be reused by other researchers, meaning that we reinvent (or redigitise) the wheel far too often. This resource is aimed at giving practical advice for arts and humanities scholars who are willing to take their first steps in research data management but don’t know where to begin. Our approach to data management views it as a reflective process that exposes and tweaks existing behaviours, rather than one that introduces specific tools. It is intended to encourage awareness of one’s own processes and mindfulness about how they could be more open and how and how small changes across three points in your research workflow can make big differences.