Author: Erzsébet Tóth-Czifra

DARIAH’s highlights for the Open Access Week 2020

Beyond any doubt, 2020 marked an extraordinary year in the development of Open Access. To celebrate Open Access Week of this special year, we brought together a brief selection of events, resources and tools that help scholarly communities to gain back control over scholarly communication infrastructure. In addition to DARIAH’s highlights, we also recommend programs from the rich Open Access Week calendar of the Open Access Book Network.

Launch of the ELDAH GDPR Wizard – Interview with Walter Scholger

Today, I am talking with Walter Scholger, Institute manager of the Centre for Information Modelling – Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ZIM-ACDH), co-chair of DARIAH’s ELDAH Working Group, on the occasion of the launch of the DARIAH ELDAH Consent Form Wizard. We will chat about how ELDAH’s work helps us to navigate through the ethical and legal complexities of arts and humanities scholarship. Or, in other words, how we can do and share our research the right way.

Open Scholar Stars interview series: Interview with Kathleen Gregory

In the next episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with Kathleen Gregory, Researcher and PhD Candidate at Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS). Why is scholarly data discovery a social practice? What are the skills that are important in effective data discovery and evaluation for reuse? How the data landscape could and should change in the near future and what are the special flavors of data search in the arts and humanities disciplines? Click to read what Kathleen’s research reveals us about all these exciting issues.

In memoriam of Jon Tennant (1988-2020)

We will remember April 2020 as days of uncertainty and tragic losses worldwide. In this extraordinary time, we do not only mourn victims of the pandemic. Just as incomprehensibly, on the 9th of April we lost Jon Tennant, a bright and tireless pioneer of Open Science and democracy in access to knowledge. In this post, I wish to connect you with and highlight pieces from his legacy.


A sneak peek into the SSH component of EOSC: interview with the SSHOC Marketplace team

From the beginning of 2019, DARIAH is contributing to the development of the SSH component of the European Open Science Cloud. This bold endeavour is coming to existence through the Social Sciences and Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC) project where Europea n infrastructures: DARIAH, CLARIN, SHARE, ESS, and CESSDA (who is leading the project) teamed up to build a transformational resource for the arts, humanities and social sciences, aligned with the EOSC but also with the requirements of these research communities. Not much after the project celebrated its first year, I spoke with the DARIAH-SSHOC team, Frank Fischer, Matej Ďurčo, Laure Barbot and Clara Petitfils about how the SSH Open Marketplace is taking shape.

Open Science and DH tools that come handy at the time of corona (and beyond)

As a response to the challenges ahead, from last week, suddenly online became the default means of teaching for the great majority of European schools and higher education institutions. In response to the immediate challenges coming with the rapid switch to online-only teaching systems, a variety of crowdsourced collections started to float around on Twitter, blogs and other online platforms (you can find a selection them at the bottom of this post) – and I could not help but think about some Open Science and DH tools that I think could be valuable additions to any distant learning setting, regardless on which institutional apparatus we have at our disposal.

Open Access Week special edition #2: interview with the ScholarLed team

This year, we are celebrating Open Access Week by introducing fair and scholar-led Open Access publishing initiatives to the DARIAH communities. l over publishing. In the second episode, we spoke with Lucy Barnes and Dr. Janneke Adema from the the ScholarLed team. Lucy and Janneke tell us about price and prestige, what kind of experiences sparked the ScholarLed collective to life, why scholars’ involvement in scholarly publishing is important, and of course, how the DARIAH communities can interact with the consortium. Enjoy!

Laying the Pavement Where People Actually Walk: Thoughts on Our Chances of Bringing Scholarship Back to the Heart of Scholarly Communication

Recently, the ScholarLed team invited me to contribute to their blog post collection celebrating Open Access Week 2019. It was my pleasure to share some of my thoughts on the conflict between the richness of contemporary scholarship in the arts and the prestige economy that defines our current academic evaluation culture. You can also read the post here on DARIAHOpen or on ScholarLed’s blog together with the other pieces of the collection. In our last Open Access week post on Friday, we take the chance to bring you closer to the initiative.

Open Access Week special edition #1: interview with Dr. Samuel Moore, co-organiser of the Radical Open Access collective

This year, we are celebrating Open Access Week by introducing fair and scholar-led Open Access publishing initiatives to the DARIAH communities. In the first episode, Dr. Samuel Moore, co-organizer of the Radical Open Access collective shares his views on which flavors of Open Access works best for arts and humanities research.

DARIAH endorses the statement from OPERAS in response to the ‘Open Research Library’, a new initiative from Knowledge Unlatched

On 16 May 2019, Knowledge Unlatched announced the launch of a new hosting platform for Open Access books, the Open Research Library (ORL). Since the announcement multiple actor groups involved in the production of open monographs have voiced their concerns about the new platform as it goes against the fundamental principles and values that define open, transparent and community-led scholarly infrastructures. At DARIAH, we believe that the sustainability, optimal coverage, and most importantly the openness of scholarly infrastructural components are key in shaping the future of scholarly communication for the better. Therefore, we would here like to express our endorsement for the statement by our sister infrastructure, OPERAS, in response to the Open Research Library. The full text of their statement can be found below. In support of open infrastructures: A statement from OPERAS in response to the ‘Open Research Library’, a new initiative from Knowledge Unlatched On May 16,...

Open data for humanists: big differences in small steps

In the arts and humanities, digital data production is still expensive, challenging and time-consuming. We all know this, and yet the results of these processes often in the end can’t be reused by other researchers, meaning that we reinvent (or redigitise) the wheel far too often. This resource is aimed at giving practical advice for arts and humanities scholars who are willing to take their first steps in research data management but don’t know where to begin. Our approach to data management views it as a reflective process that exposes and tweaks existing behaviours, rather than one that introduces specific tools. It is intended to encourage awareness of one’s own processes and mindfulness about how they could be more open and how and how small changes across three points in your research workflow can make big differences.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search