Category: Research Data

The Trouble With Big Data: insights from Jennifer Edmond, Jörg Lehmann, Mike Priddy and Nicola Horsley 

In this episode of our Open Scholar stars series, I am talking with a whole group: Jennifer Edmond (Trinity College Dublin), Jörg Lehmann (University of Tübingen), Mike Priddy (Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS), and Nicola Horsley (Leeds Beckett University) on occasion of the publication of their Open Access book, The Trouble With Big Data: How Datafication Displaces Cultural Practices. We discuss inherent disciplinary and cultural biases in doing data-driven research,  digitization agendas,  data and power, data metaphors, apen access book publishing and more. Enjoy! 

SSHOC-DARIAH Train-the-Trainer Research Data Management Bootcamp

In this blog, you can read a brief recap of the SSHOC-DARIAH Train-the-Trainer Research Data Management Bootcamp (8. and 11.02.2021). Click to access the materials and also to read about how the event supported new data support professionals in the Social Sciences and Humanities to gain practical, hands-on experiences and exchange around key RDM topics of cost management, GDPR and ethical issues of working with social media data and dealing with third-party data coming from Cultural Heritage institutions.

Connecting Arts and Humanities to the European open data commons: the OpenAIRE-DARIAH Research Community Gateway

The role of discovery platforms is becoming crucial as we produce an increasing amount of scholarly publications year by year. Not only they serve as a filtering interface (generous or not :-)) to mediate between ourselves, machines and the body of knowledge that is impossible to manually navigate (and stay on top of), but they also have a strong influence on knowledge representation in general. In this post, we take a look at how DARIAH helps connect Arts and Humanities research data and other content types to the OpenAIRE Research Graph to increase their visibility and reusability beyond geographical, language and disciplinary borders.

The “Holy Grail” of Digital Humanists – Some Thoughts About “Understanding Data” (for Humanists)

As a reader of blog posts, you might be well aware how important role commentaries happening on blogs can play in the establishment of a specific scholarly discourses. In this piece, you can read our guest author’s, Stefan Karcher’s reflection on Jim Casey’s recent blog post, Taste the Data where he introduces a new didactic approach to discover important information and structures in a data set. So, how do your data taste?

A sneak peek into the SSH component of EOSC: interview with the SSHOC Marketplace team

From the beginning of 2019, DARIAH is contributing to the development of the SSH component of the European Open Science Cloud. This bold endeavour is coming to existence through the Social Sciences and Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC) project where Europea n infrastructures: DARIAH, CLARIN, SHARE, ESS, and CESSDA (who is leading the project) teamed up to build a transformational resource for the arts, humanities and social sciences, aligned with the EOSC but also with the requirements of these research communities. Not much after the project celebrated its first year, I spoke with the DARIAH-SSHOC team, Frank Fischer, Matej Ďurčo, Laure Barbot and Clara Petitfils about how the SSH Open Marketplace is taking shape.

The ACDH virtual hackathon series: Open Data for Open Source solutions

At the beginning of 2019, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ACDH) started an experiment: For the first time ever, we published the calls for participation in three virtual hackathons. The hackathons would focus on Open Data sets publicly available online, and the tasks to perform on these data would involve creating Open Source code. Each of the hackathons had a special theme and was co-timed with events that involve an aspect of Openness. These events also inspired the choice of the respective data sets. The best contributions would be determined by an international board of judges and receive cash prizes. The criteria for judgement were the following: Creativity, innovation (e.g. Is the approach/idea new and unique? Does it do something that hasn’t been done before? Does it provide new insights into the data? Does the hack provide a new/faster/clearer solution to the old...

Open data for humanists: big differences in small steps

In the arts and humanities, digital data production is still expensive, challenging and time-consuming. We all know this, and yet the results of these processes often in the end can’t be reused by other researchers, meaning that we reinvent (or redigitise) the wheel far too often. This resource is aimed at giving practical advice for arts and humanities scholars who are willing to take their first steps in research data management but don’t know where to begin. Our approach to data management views it as a reflective process that exposes and tweaks existing behaviours, rather than one that introduces specific tools. It is intended to encourage awareness of one’s own processes and mindfulness about how they could be more open and how and how small changes across three points in your research workflow can make big differences.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search