Category: Innovative publishing

DARIAH signs the Manifesto on Science as Global Public Good

The Global Summit on Diamond Open Access in Toluca, Mexico (23-27 October 2023) brought the Diamond OA community together in a dialogue between journal editors, organizations, experts, and stakeholders from all continent. This event was organised by Redalyc, UAEMéx, AmeliCA, UNESCO, CLACSO, UÓR, ANR, cOAlition S, OPERAS and Science Europe. Some conclusions have emerged and above all, a Manifesto on Science as Global Public Good: Non commercial Open Access (https://globaldiamantoa.org/manifiesto/) which main principles are : Universal right Equity, diversity and multilingualism Scholar property and human heritage Recognition and assessment Collaboration Declaring Non commercial Open Access, through its Diamond and Green routes, as scholar property and a via to attain Science as Global Public Good is compulsory. A historically dominant approach in Latin America, the Caribbean, and many other countries from other regions. Having a strong commitment to Open Science has always been important to DARIAH as it brings on collaborative...

Born-digital journals built on top of scholarly powerhouses: 10+ 1 things you wanted to know about overlay journals

In this post, we are going to take a look at a significant Open Access innovation: overlay journal publishing. We will see what is the value in them and how epistemic cultures shape their uptake in the arts and humanities disciplines. For easier readability, the post is, somewhat arbitrarily, structured along the frequently asked questions that I collected from the DARIAH Open Science helpdesk, workshops and conversations on the topic.

SSHOC-DARIAH Train-the-Trainer Research Data Management Bootcamp

In this blog, you can read a brief recap of the SSHOC-DARIAH Train-the-Trainer Research Data Management Bootcamp (8. and 11.02.2021). Click to access the materials and also to read about how the event supported new data support professionals in the Social Sciences and Humanities to gain practical, hands-on experiences and exchange around key RDM topics of cost management, GDPR and ethical issues of working with social media data and dealing with third-party data coming from Cultural Heritage institutions.

Launch of the ELDAH GDPR Wizard – Interview with Walter Scholger

Today, I am talking with Walter Scholger, Institute manager of the Centre for Information Modelling – Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ZIM-ACDH), co-chair of DARIAH’s ELDAH Working Group, on the occasion of the launch of the DARIAH ELDAH Consent Form Wizard. We will chat about how ELDAH’s work helps us to navigate through the ethical and legal complexities of arts and humanities scholarship. Or, in other words, how we can do and share our research the right way.

DARIAH’s input to the Open Consultation for the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC)

On the 20th of July, the EOSC Executive Board launched a large-scale open consultation on the EOSC Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA). The aim of this consultation was to shape the strategic objectives, action areas, implementation priorities and partnerships for the 2024-2028 phase of the EOSC development. In this post, we put forward the key points of DARIAH’s response to the consultation.

6 innovations from the humanities that make Open Access publishing a reality to everyone

One of the common beliefs that often comes up when discussing research dissemination strategies is that Open Access publishing equals high publishing costs. Shifting the burden of payment from readers to authors (or their funders or institutions) indeed creates a new set of inequalities in open scholarly communication as article or book processing charges (APCs or BPCs) are not affordable for many scholarly communities. This recognition gave rise to more equitable forms of Open Access publishing. These models rely on library consortial funding mechanisms, crowdfunding, freemium services, institutional grants or funders’ collective investments into shared infrastructures and therefore create and maintain publication forums that are openly and freely available both for authors and readers. Some of the most successful free-to-publish Open Access endeavors have been emerging from arts and humanities in response to the particular needs of the humanities scholars concerning publishing formats, academic evaluation, and funding availability. In the...

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search